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Denis Leamy 

There has been a lot of learning from the first phase of the Peace III Programme, and as we move forward to phase two, Partnerships will be encouraged to think and act more strategically. The EU Peace Programme has invested much over many years in the peace process in Northern Ireland and the border counties. Its success will be to have helped establish a firm foundation for building a Shared Society that both respects difference and acknowledges our interdependence.

 

CEO
Pobal, Holbrook House

Holles Street, Dublin 2

 

Duncan Morrow 

Each Partnership area is engaged in significant and important work to address sectarianism and racism. So often, this work goes unnoticed, unrecognised, hidden and not acknowledged. Yet it is the cornerstone and life blood of the peace process, building positive relations at the local level.


Chief Executive
Community Relations Council

Speak Your Peace
26 February 2011
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Those involved in Theme 1.1 of the EU Peace III Programme, held a special ‘Speak Your Peace’ conference in Armagh on the 24th February 2011 on the work of the Peace III Partnerships. Hosted by Pobal and the Community Relations Council. The conference was an opportunity to reflect on the work of Phase I of the programme, ‘Building Positive Relationships at local level’, as it prepares to move forward to Phase 2. Those attending were those taking part in the various Partnership projects. Denis Leamy,

 

Duncan Morrow, Chief Executive of the Community Relations Council said, ‘There has been a lot of learning from the first phase of the Peace III Programme, and as we move forward to phase two, Partnerships will be encouraged to think and act more strategically. The EU Peace Programme has invested much over many years in the peace process in Northern Ireland and the border counties. Its success will be to have helped establish a firm foundation for building a Shared Society that both respects difference and acknowledges our interdependence.’

 

The conference held three discussion sessions. The first explored the current context and policy in both north and south to promote and support peace building initiatives. The second heard feedback from evaluations and measurement of the work of the Peace Partnerships so far. The third highlighted two examples of Peace III Partnerships making a practical difference on sectarianism, racism and cross border work (Donegal Partnership and the North East Partnership).

 

Participants at the conference also had an opportunity to visit two local projects- PLACE in Portadown and County Monaghan Community Network’s ‘Communities Sharing Project’ in Monaghan.