Pobal Maps Contact Info

Contact Information

Contact: John Manning

Email: jmanning@pobal.ie

Telephone: 01 511 7339

More Pobal Contact Information

Useful Links
Liam Butler

Pobal Maps

Publicly available our online GIS system, builds upon the Pobal- Haase Deprivation Index for Small Areas which provides detailed information on local areas. We continually add and update our programme datasets creating an invaluable tool for measuring and tackling disadvantage. Please feel free to explore our datasets and new features on Pobal Maps by following the above link.

 

  

 Director Corporate Services

 

 
Pobal has now launched the new and updated Pobal Maps. The new system is a faster, easier to use and more accessible version of the previous system, allowing more convenient access to data such as nationwide childcare services and the Pobal HP Deprivation Index.
 
Some of the key new features include:
 
·        Easy access via mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets.
·        No need to download additional software (such as Microsoft Silverlight), allowing easier access for first time users.
·        Themed viewers that are tailor made to suit user requirements, such as childcare services, deprivation analysis, area profiling and reporting, and the location of Pobal funded services.
 
The system is designed with simplicity for the user in mind, and there are detailed tutorial videos included under the resources section.
 
We hope that you find the system to be an improvement, and we would welcome your feedback. Any comments or suggestions can be sent along with any user queries to enquiries@pobal.ie.
 
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Welcome to the Deprivation Index section of the website. As of August 2012, Pobal is delighted to announce the release of the new Pobal HP Deprivation Index (Haase and Pratschke, 2012), which builds upon previous indices and provides data based on the 2011 census returns.
 
In simple terms, the Pobal HP Deprivation Index is a method of measuring the relative affluence or disadvantage of a particular geographical area using data compiled from various censuses. A scoring is given to the area based on a national average of zero and ranging from approximately -35 (being the most disadvantaged) to +35 (being the most affluent). In addition to this, percentage data for the area is given under the following categories:
 
-         Population Change
-         Age Dependency Ratio
-         Lone Parent Ratio
-         Primary Education Only
-         Third Level Education
-         Unemployment Rate (male and female)
-         Proportion living in Local Authority Rented Housing
 
The relative index scoring and the above percentage data focuses particularly on the previous two censuses,  enabling easy comparison of data between 2006 and 2011. This index is of particular significance given the economic changes that have occurred nationally during this period. The change in the index scoring and in each measured category is also calculated, meaning that to a national, regional and local level the increase or decrease can be easily viewed.
 
The Pobal HP Deprivation index can be viewed in this section of the website as raw data, and there are also relevant documents containing additional information, including how the index is constructed and statistical features. The index however can also be viewed through Pobal Maps, a free online Geographical Information System map viewer. Pobal Maps provides a visual representation of the data which is crucial in terms of highlighting pockets of relative disadvantage, especially to small area level, and is a valuable resource in targeting and tackling disadvantage. The system also allows users to run specific reports to selected areas, as well as visually compare changes between 2006 – 2011.
 
The New Census Geography of Small Areas


Previously, the smallest geographical area for such and index was Electoral Divisions (EDs) –which could range in population from under 100 to over 32,000. This range in size meant that comparative relative scoring could be problematic – scoring an area with 32,000 people as ‘affluent’ or ‘disadvantaged’ would not reflect the many possible levels of either within it. Moving away from EDs, and towards the new ‘Small Areas’ marks a major advance, particularly where a census‐based deprivation index is used as a proxy for individual‐level social position. The Small Area Population Statistics (SAPS) of the 2011 Census of Population has been released at the level of 18,488 Small Areas (SAs) – an increase from 15,383 as per the previous index. In this new census geography, SAs are standardised in size, with a minimum of 50 households and a mean of just under 100, thus effectively providing street‐level information on the Irish population. The HP Index is the only deprivation index in Ireland to have implemented the new small area census geography using both the 2006 and 2011 census data in a consistent manner.

Information & Documents
Note: The above index relates information for each Electoral Division (ED), however the Small Area (SA) data is aggregated to create the scoring for each ED. The SA data set, being to a smaller geographical area and a more consistent population size, is a much more accurate level for measurement, therefore the aggregation to ED level is also more accurate. To view the index at small area level please see the area profiles section, or user reports may be run to specific boundaries from Pobal Maps.
Note: The present analysis supersedes and replaces the previous analysis by Haase & Pratschke (2008), as all data is derived from a new matrix of observations covering the relevant census periods.
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Pobal Maps
 
Pobal Maps is our GIS (Geographical Information System) online application. This system builds upon the Pobal HP Deprivation Index for Small Areas, which provides very detailed information on local areas and gives a score calculated against a national average. The reporting section of the system allows users to download data and reports to their opwn specific boundary- county, Local Authority, Local Development Company, RAPID etc. Pobal Maps allows users to easily compare and contrast electoral division and now small area profiles in terms of their relative level of affluence or disadvantage, allowing a more targeted approach for bodies such as Local Development Companies.

         Small Areas

The Small Area Population Statistics (SAPS) of the 2011 Census of Population has been released at the level of 18,488 Small Areas (SAs) – up from 15,383 as per the previous index. This increase in small areas has been made in order to maintain the consistent standardisation of area sizes over the 5 year census period. It also means that the current 2011 data supercedes and replaces all previous data as it is now based on the increased numbers of SAs. this new census geography, SAs are standardised in size, with a minimum of 50 households and a mean of just under 100. The move away from Electoral Divisions (EDs) –which could range in population from under 100 to over 32,000 – marks a major advance, particularly where a census‐based deprivation index is used as a proxy for individual‐level social position.

         Maintaining Confidentiality

An important consideration when publishing census data is to protect the confidentiality of individuals and households. To this end, the CSO decided that no data should be disclosed where a spatial unit comprises less than 50 households.

 
The Online System The system is layer based; a user can first of all layer boundaries; local authority, electoral division, townland, small area, city/county childcare committee, RAPID/CLAR Area etc. An electoral division or small area in any urban or rural part of the country can then be selected, and colour coded data can then be layered under the following headings:
 
• Relative Index Score
• Population Change
• Age Dependency Ratio
• Lone Parent Ratio
• Proportion with primary education only
• Proportion with third level education
• Male unemployment rate
• Female unemployment rate
• Proportion in local authority rented accommodation

 

Each of these data sets can then be measured, by every ED or SA, on a seven point scale, ranging from extremely disadvantaged, to very affluent. The percentages of persons which fall into each of these categories are also displayable. The relative index score is the overall indicator for each area. This score is a combination of census category data used to construct a national average of 0, with each area being given a minus or plus score against this average. A score of -30 for example would indicate an area of extreme disadvantage, a score or +30 being an area that is very affluent.